Everything you ever wanted to know about Fluff In this Sept. 27, 2013, file photo, containers are filled with Marshmallow Fluff and move along an assembly line during production in Lynn, Mass. The marshmallow concoction that's been smeared on a century's worth of sandwiches has inspired a festival and other sticky remembrances as it turns 100 in 2017. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
Everything you ever wanted to know about Fluff
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Fluff turns 100 this year. The marshmallow creation that has been smeared on a century's worth of schoolchildren's sandwiches has inspired a festival and other sticky remembrances.
 
Every year, between 5 million and 7 million pounds of the sticky cream invented in suburban Boston in 1917 is produced and sold worldwide. Half the supply is bought up by New Englanders and people in upstate New York.
 
It came of age in the 1960s. That is when generations of schoolchildren started clamoring for "Fluffernutter" sandwiches. They still are made by slathering peanut butter and Fluff between two slices of white bread.
 
Over the past decade, fans of Fluff have been staging an annual "What the Fluff?" festival. It takes place in Somerville, Massachusetts. That's where the American lunchbox icon was born.
 
Here is a fluffy look at its history:
 
In 1917, Montreal-born confectioner Archibald Query crafted the original recipe.
 
Query is said to have whipped up the first batches in his own kitchen in Somerville. Then he would sell it door to door. Following World War I, there was a sugar shortage in the U.S. So Query sold the recipe for $500 to two war veterans, H. Allen Durkee and Fred L. Mower.
 
The recipe has stayed with Durkee Mower Inc. ever since. It's the only product the family-owned company makes.
 
In 1920, Durkee and Mower began producing and selling Fluff, which they first named Toot Sweet Marshmallow Fluff. The company moved to a factory in East Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1929.
 
The original recipe hasn't changed: corn syrup, sugar syrup, dried egg whites and vanillin. And the jar's packaging is only slightly different. That is according to Mimi Graney, author of a forthcoming book, "Fluff: The Sticky Sweet Story of an American Icon."
 
Fluff lovers "associate it with their own childhood and image of home," Graney says. There are competing products sold by Kraft, Solo Foods and others.
 
The 12th annual "What the Fluff?" Festival will be staged in September. It was started as a way to revive Somerville's now-trendy Union Square neighborhood. The festival draws about 10,000 people. They gather for activities including cooking and eating contests, Fluff jousting, Fluff blowing, a game called Blind Man Fluff and concerts.
 
Somerville residents tend to have a soft spot for Fluff.
 
"It totally takes me back to my childhood," said Amy Hensen, a 43-year-old Somervillian.
 
Mayor Joseph Curtatone likens the product to his community's eclectic vibe.
 
"It's original, creative, and a little bit funky but that's why we love it," he said.
 
U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams spent 322 days in space on two missions to the International Space Station. She made Fluffernutter sandwiches on board.  Williams attended high school in Needham, Massachusetts, so Fluff was a comfort food.

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CRITICAL THINKING QUESTION
Why is Fluff connected to childhood?
Write your answers in the comments section below


COMMENTS (67)
  • joeyh-
    2/08/2017 - 08:39 a.m.

    Fluffernutter was eaten by kids a lot, especially in the 80's. The main portion of customers of Fluff is 40 year old adults. They ate that as kids and now when the have it, it brings them back to their childhood.

  • alant-
    2/08/2017 - 08:43 a.m.


    It has been around for years and it has now come back into children lunch boxes. I really never tryed Fluff but i would want to try it some time. I think its a great thing it is coming back in 2017.

  • saraip-
    2/08/2017 - 08:45 a.m.

    I never tried Fluff before but it sounds very good. This Fluff stuff sounds very interesting I hope to try this one day if I won't forget about it.

    • rileyn-kul
      2/10/2017 - 01:01 p.m.

      I have never had fluff either. Now that I have heard about it I may have to go try to find some to buy, maybe at Walmart. I love sweet things and marshmallows so it should be perfect for me.

      • dylann-kul
        2/16/2017 - 01:46 p.m.

        I agree with Riley Nehlich. I love sweet things. I feel like fluff would taste amazing. It would be like Marshmallow heaven. It would bring me back to the happiness I felt as a child.

      • coltonw-kul
        2/16/2017 - 03:53 p.m.

        How could you have never have Marshmallow fluff? That's like not having Nutella. They are staples of a well rounded person, and by well rounded I mean slightly plump.

  • haleyh1-4-pla
    2/09/2017 - 12:42 p.m.

    Marshmallow fluff turns 100 years old! Marshmallow fluff is an iconic part of many peoples childhood and adulthood. Marshmallow fluff was first invented by a man in his kitchen and he then sold it door to door. Later, during the sugar shortage, he sold the recipe to two war veterans. Ever since, marshmallow fluff has circulated across the country and is happy for it's 100th birthday.

  • alis-har
    2/09/2017 - 01:22 p.m.

    Fluff is connected to childhood because it is made out of marshmallows. When kids are little some of them are used to having cookouts with then cookouts lead to smores. When I was little I remember eating smores over at the race track. We are starting to do that again. Some children have never even heard of smores at all. I feel bad for those kids because smores are super good and they make summer, etc. memories a lot better because you remember eating the chocolate, creamy marshmallow, and the graham crackers.

  • ashh-ver
    2/10/2017 - 09:17 a.m.

    I feel like I've been missing out my whole life. I have no found memory of fluff as other people. It doesn't sound too good to me, I don't like sweet stuff. I never eat the frosting on the cake. I would like to try fluff though.

    • matthewm-kul
      2/13/2017 - 11:54 a.m.

      I agree because sweet things are the only thing a child eats and i never remember hearing about fluff or anything like it.

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