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He sold his land to pay for her schooling

Tej Bahadur Verma, 50, takes his daughter Sushma Verma home from her school. – AP photos
Tej Bahadur Verma, 50, takes his daughter Sushma Verma home from her school. – AP photos
He sold his land to pay for her schooling
Associated Press
Associated Press
India is a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school. But Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.

The 13-year-old girl from a poor family enrolled in a master's degree in microbiology. Her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter's tuition. He hopes to catapult her into India's growing middle class.

Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13. These milestone were only possible through the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.

"They allowed me to do what I wanted to do," Verma says. "I hope that other parents don't impose their choices on their children."

Sushma lives a very modest life with her three younger siblings and her parents. She eats, sleeps and studies alongside them in a cramped single-room apartment in Lucknow, the capital of Uttar Pradesh state.

Their only income is her father's daily wage of $3.50 for laboring on construction sites. Their most precious possessions include a study table and a second-hand computer.

It is not a great atmosphere for studying, she admitted. "There are a lot of dreams ... All of them cannot be fulfilled."

But having no television and little else at home has advantages, she said. "There is nothing to do but study."

Sushma begins her studies next week at Lucknow's B. R. Ambedkar Central University, though her father is already ferrying her to and from campus each day on his bicycle so she can meet with teachers before classes begin.

Her first choice was to become a doctor, but she cannot take the test to qualify for medical school until she is 18.

"So I opted for the MSc and then I will do a doctorate," she said.

Sushma is a skinny, poised girl with shoulder-length hair. She is not the first high-achiever in her family. Her older brother graduated from high school at 9, and in 2007 became one of India's youngest computer science graduates at 14.

In another family, Sushma might not have been able to follow him into higher education. Millions of Indian children are still not enrolled in grade school. Many of them are girls whose parents choose to hold them back in favor of advancing their sons. Some from conservative village cultures are expected only to get married.

For Sushma, her father sold his only pieces of land in a village in Uttar Pradesh for the cut-rate price of $400 to cover some of her school fees.

The rest of Sushma's school fees will come from a charity that traditionally works in improving rural sewage systems, which gave her a grant of $12,600.

"The girl is an inspiration for students from elite backgrounds" who are born with everything, said Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak of Sulabh International, who decided to help after seeing a local television program on Sushma. She is also receiving financial aid from well-wishing civilians and other charities.

Critical thinking challenge: Why is Sushma's story so unusual, as a girl in India?


- Posted on September 16, 2013
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Sushma's story is like one of the many stories that are famous like Malala. Her family support her and her dad did everything to get her up to heaven. I think bounds like this are very special, and we need to protect it.

I love this story because it shows that no matter where you live you can still be smart. Although it did cost this family a lot of sacrifice. This just shows how grateful we should be about the stuff we have. We have cars and buses to drive us to school, But this girls father spent some time riding her to school on his bike!

Her story is unusual because i think that most of the parents would not sell there land just for a girl to go to school most moms and dads would say just stay home. That right there is a real dad and he really do cares for his daughter.

it unusual because every girl in India want to get married and that it but she does not what that she want her dad to be proud of her and she want to pay her dad for the sacrifice.

I think it's so amazing that she has had this opportunity. I'm so happy that this happened to her. I wish that everyone would take this to heart and this would happen all over the world.

Why don't girls go to school still in India? Why are they so expected to follow the rules and let the boys take education? It doesn't really seem obvious how they explained her apartment. That doesn't really seem comfy but satisfying enough. I think she shouldn't stop dreaming of being a doctor. Even though she has to be 18.

Awww that is so sweet you can really tell he cares about her education this is making me cry no joke their are teardrops on my keyboard

though this is hard to do, I think that you can do whatever you want to, whenever you want to if you push yourself hard enough.

That's sad and loving they sold there home and property so his daughter can go to school and get an education. That is caring and showing his love to his daughter. To think about selling your property is nice but then it's sad because you have no where to sleep,live,eat shower or anything . The father is showing his love and care to his daughter

That's sad and loving they sold there home and property so his daughter can go to school and get an education. That is caring and showing his love to his daughter. To think about selling your property is nice but then it's sad because you have no where to sleep,live,eat shower or anything . The father is showing his love and care to his daughter